Big-data helps define the burden of sarcoidosis

Feb. 7, 2018

Physician-scientists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham using “big-data” recently summarized in the Journal of the American Heart Association the prevalence of cardiovascular manifestations, rates of defibrillator placement (ICD), and predictors of in-hospital mortality in sarcoidosis—a disorder that affects multiple organs.

Sarcoidosis is a systemic illness with a strong propensity to involve the cardiovascular system. It is the growth of tiny collections of inflammatory cells—granulomas—in different parts of the body, most commonly the lungs, lymph nodes, eyes, and skin. Utilizing the largest in-patient database—the National Inpatient Sample—a team of researchers from UAB identified more than half a million sarcoidosis hospitalizations without any present or past history of ischemic heart disease from 2005 through 2014 in the United States.

Nirav Patel, M.D., first author of the Journal of the American Heart Association piece, designed and conducted the analyses for the study.

“In previously conducted studies, there was a lack of assessment of the prevalence of cardiovascular manifestations, and trends of ICD implantation in sarcoidosis hospitalizations,” Patel said. “Sarcoidosis with naturally accompanying cardiovascular manifestations has more complications, and a greater risk of sudden death. Thus, there is a considerable interest in identifying sarcoidosis with naturally accompanying cardiovascular manifestations.”

Researchers have found the rate of hospitalization for sarcoidosis has increased, and in-hospital mortality associated with sarcoidosis decreased from 2005 to 2014. Heart failure and arrhythmias were the most prevalent cardiovascular manifestations in sarcoidosis, followed by pulmonary hypertension, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and conduction disorder. Conversely, increasing hospitalizations with sarcoidosis, rates of ICD implantations were low—less than 1%—and have not shown any upward trend from 2005 through 2014.

Additionally, African-American race was found to be significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. In an adjusted analysis, African-Americans with sarcoidosis had higher in-hospital mortality and cardiac arrest compared with Caucasians.

Authors emphasized that clinicians and investigators alike carry an important responsibility to proactively investigate sarcoidosis with cardiovascular manifestations.

Newswise has the full release

Sponsored Recommendations

A Cyber Shield for Healthcare: Exploring HHS's $1.3 Billion Security Initiative

Unlock the Future of Healthcare Cybersecurity with Erik Decker, Co-Chair of the HHS 405(d) workgroup! Don't miss this opportunity to gain invaluable knowledge from a seasoned ...

Enhancing Remote Radiology: How Zero Trust Access Revolutionizes Healthcare Connectivity

This content details how a cloud-enabled zero trust architecture ensures high performance, compliance, and scalability, overcoming the limitations of traditional VPN solutions...

Spotlight on Artificial Intelligence

Unlock the potential of AI in our latest series. Discover how AI is revolutionizing clinical decision support, improving workflow efficiency, and transforming medical documentation...

Beyond the VPN: Zero Trust Access for a Healthcare Hybrid Work Environment

This whitepaper explores how a cloud-enabled zero trust architecture ensures secure, least privileged access to applications, meeting regulatory requirements and enhancing user...