Breach Inlet

Jan. 10, 2012
Last week, as I often do, I took a short drive over to Breach Inlet, the narrow body of water where the river and the Intracoastal Waterway join the Atlantic Ocean here in Charleston. Breach Inlet is linked to a famous Revolutionary War-era battle fought over two hundred years ago.

Last week, as I often do, I took a short drive over to Breach Inlet, the narrow body of water where the river and the Intracoastal Waterway join the Atlantic Ocean here in Charleston. Breach Inlet is linked to a famous Revolutionary War-era battle fought over two hundred years ago. The British soldiers, especially, suffered from the oppressive heat, mosquitoes and our famous no-see-um’s during their stay. The unique positioning of the offshore sand bars in the area around Breach Inlet makes it a popular spot for windurfers who enjoy the  safe haven when high winds or rough waters send them off into the deep waters. On a very windy day, windsurfers can face a real challenge.

Breach Inlet is also where I go to be quiet and think. There is a small parking area where you can sit in your car on colder days (we don’t get many of those) to experience a picture perfect view of the Atlantic Ocean. And enjoy it – I do! After spending the day talking with clients and candidates, I sometimes take the long way home, crossing the Ravenel Bridge and veering right towards Sullivan’s Island. Just before I get to the heart of Sullivan’s, I take a left, and a couple of miles later cross over Breach Inlet to get a glimpse of that fabulous view of the Atlantic. It adds at least fifteen extra minutes to my ride home, but it’s always worth the extra effort.

My wife and I took a short walk on the beach near Sullivan’s Island on New Year’s Day, just to get away from it all for a few hours. For some reason the ocean gives me a sense of calmness that I just can't get enough of. As we walked a few miles down the beach, I pondered the events of 2011 – some good, others not so good. The markets we serve are busier than most industries', and I am thankful for that. 2011 was better than 2010, and I am thankful for that too. This year is an election year and the forecast for better unemployment numbers look promising, and I am (also) very thankful for that! I've been hearing from candidates who are getting offers after being laid off or down-sized in 2011, and once again, I’m thankful.

I closed that chapter and mentally put the year behind me at Breach Inlet with great hopes for the New Year. As I drove away, I crossed the bridge to get one more look at the Atlantic and left 2011 in my rearview mirror. It felt pretty good!

 I hope each of you have a wonderful 2012 and let’s make it our very best!   

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