Study: Physicians Say iPad Not Ready for Patient Care

Feb. 1, 2012
Spyglass Consulting Group, a market consulting and intelligence firm from Menlo Park, Calif., released a study which states 80 percent of physicians believe Apple iPad has a promising future in healthcare but they are skeptical that it is ready to transform patient care delivery today. The study, Point of Care Computing for Physicians 2012, shows trends how U.S.-based physicians are using mobile solutions at point of care to streamline productivity, enhance patient safety, and reduce the risk of medical errors.

Spyglass Consulting Group, a market consulting and intelligence firm from Menlo Park, Calif., released a study which states 80 percent of physicians believe Apple iPad has a promising future in healthcare but they are skeptical that it is ready to transform patient care delivery today. The study, Point of Care Computing for Physicians 2012, shows trends how U.S.-based physicians are using mobile solutions at point of care to streamline productivity, enhance patient safety, and reduce the risk of medical errors.

According to Spyglass, 98 percent of physicians interviewed have embraced mobile computing devices to support their personal and professional workflows. Mobile device adoption, the report states, is being driven by technology innovation including easy-to-use, low-cost, lightweight mobile devices, widespread cellular broadband availability (3G/4G), and cloud-based ecosystem to support Internet-connected applications, and the emergence of location-based services.

Yet despite this, the study found 75percent of physicians interviewed reported that hospital IT was resistant to supporting personal mobile devices on the corporate network. Hospital IT, the report states, believes personal devices are insecure, less reliable, and more expensive to deploy, support and maintain than desktop computers.

In the report, 83percent of physicians interviewed were using desktop computers as their primary device for accessing corporate assets and patient data whether they were at the hospital, in their office, or at home. Physicians were found to be using mobile devices to access clinical information when they were outside of their normal working environment.

Sponsored Recommendations

Data: The Bedrock of Digital Engagement

Join us on March 21st to discover how data serves as the cornerstone of digital engagement in healthcare. Learn from Frederick Health's transformative journey and gain practical...

Northeast Georgia Health System: Scaling Digital Transformation in a Competitive Market

Find out how Northeast Georgia Health System (NGHS) enabled digital access to achieve new patient acquisition goals in Georgia's highly competitive healthcare market.

2023 Care Access Benchmark Report for Healthcare Organizations

To manage growing consumer expectations and shrinking staff resources, forward-thinking healthcare organizations have adopted digital strategies, but recent research shows that...

Increase ROI Through AI: Unlocking Scarce Capacity & Staffing

Unlock the potential of AI to optimize capacity and staffing in healthcare. Join us on February 27th to discover how innovative AI-driven solutions can revolutionize operations...